Will the Syrian Refugee Crisis Affect the Election?

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Will the Syrian Refugee Crisis Affect the Election?

Syrian Refugee need help

Christian voters are concerned about the Conservative Party’s reluctance to welcome Syrian refugees to Canada. Although the government has pledged to bring in 10,000 refugees, the regulations make it difficult to get help to families in need. With the recent announcement that those rules would be relaxed, some people are saying that it’s too little, too late. On the other extreme, others are concerned that the lax security will alienate hard-liners who believe the party is yielding to pressure in front of the election.

Religious Organizations Are Making the Difference

Who is stepping up in Canada to help the refugees? Since 2013, about 2,500 refugees have arrived in the country, but data has not been released about their ethnic or religious vulnerability. One news organization discovered that about half of the 1,000 refugees admitted in 2015 are individuals who are the most vulnerable. Because the United Nations has a policy to help the vulnerable first, this information is important to the government’s claim that they are working to help alleviate the crisis.

However, what’s interesting about those 500 refugees is that most of them were privately sponsored instead of being government sponsored. The Canadian government has brought in about 400 refugees and private groups have brought in about 600 refugees this year to date. Only 5 percent of the government sponsored refugees are in the vulnerable minorities that the UN is targeting. On the other hand, 90 percent of those brought in by private groups are in the minority categories that are a priority.

There are allegations that the Canadian government is cherry-picking refugees and discriminating against the Sunni or Shiite Muslims. However, private organizations are probably more equipped and better organized to handle the sponsorships. Christian organizations, in particular, have been dealing with refugees long before the current crisis.

Although Muslim communities want to lend a hand, one of the problems they face is that they are young and still paying off or renting mosques. Many Muslims are sending money abroad. In addition, they don’t have the experience dealing with the process of bringing refugees to the country. There are also national, political, and religious subdivisions which make working together more difficult.

Top Google Searches Demonstrate the Need for Information

Earlier in September, Google tracked the top queries from Canadians. The young Turkish boy who died on the coast of Turkey most likely precipitated the want of information, but it does demonstrate the desire to learn more. Over September 2 and 3, these were the most asked queries on Google:

  • How to sponsor a Syrian refugee?
  • How to help the refugees?
  • Why is the Syrian refugee crisis happening?
  • What is the cost of a Syrian refugee in Canada?

Where to Turn to Help

It’s evident that the country wants to help the refugees, but mobilization isn’t easy. It takes time to process the paperwork required by the government out of security. No one wants to just let in everyone without some sort of screening, but there is an immediacy for humanitarian aid no matter which party you support.

Hay Doun has brought in around 650 Syrian refugees since 2013. They are an Armenian Christian organization based in Montreal, and they have the experience to navigate the process and get people resettled here. Previously, Hay Doun was able to get refugees relocated in about 10 months, but even they are facing delays due to the paperwork slowdown.

Whatever your beliefs, if you’re interested in helping alleviate the crisis, you should work with the organizations who are making a difference. It’s time to rise above religious or political lines and reach out to those in need. Hopefully, the upcoming elections don’t affect what is being done to rescue the refugees and let them start a new life.

 

Universal Life Church Cananda

Universal Life Church Cananda

All Children of the Same Universe

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Will the Syrian Refugee Crisis Affect the Election?

Posted on by

Syrian Refugee need help

Christian voters are concerned about the Conservative Party’s reluctance to welcome Syrian refugees to Canada. Although the government has pledged to bring in 10,000 refugees, the regulations make it difficult to get help to families in need. With the recent announcement that those rules would be relaxed, some people are saying that it’s too little, too late. On the other extreme, others are concerned that the lax security will alienate hard-liners who believe the party is yielding to pressure in front of the election.

Religious Organizations Are Making the Difference

Who is stepping up in Canada to help the refugees? Since 2013, about 2,500 refugees have arrived in the country, but data has not been released about their ethnic or religious vulnerability. One news organization discovered that about half of the 1,000 refugees admitted in 2015 are individuals who are the most vulnerable. Because the United Nations has a policy to help the vulnerable first, this information is important to the government’s claim that they are working to help alleviate the crisis.

However, what’s interesting about those 500 refugees is that most of them were privately sponsored instead of being government sponsored. The Canadian government has brought in about 400 refugees and private groups have brought in about 600 refugees this year to date. Only 5 percent of the government sponsored refugees are in the vulnerable minorities that the UN is targeting. On the other hand, 90 percent of those brought in by private groups are in the minority categories that are a priority.

There are allegations that the Canadian government is cherry-picking refugees and discriminating against the Sunni or Shiite Muslims. However, private organizations are probably more equipped and better organized to handle the sponsorships. Christian organizations, in particular, have been dealing with refugees long before the current crisis.

Although Muslim communities want to lend a hand, one of the problems they face is that they are young and still paying off or renting mosques. Many Muslims are sending money abroad. In addition, they don’t have the experience dealing with the process of bringing refugees to the country. There are also national, political, and religious subdivisions which make working together more difficult.

Top Google Searches Demonstrate the Need for Information

Earlier in September, Google tracked the top queries from Canadians. The young Turkish boy who died on the coast of Turkey most likely precipitated the want of information, but it does demonstrate the desire to learn more. Over September 2 and 3, these were the most asked queries on Google:

  • How to sponsor a Syrian refugee?
  • How to help the refugees?
  • Why is the Syrian refugee crisis happening?
  • What is the cost of a Syrian refugee in Canada?

Where to Turn to Help

It’s evident that the country wants to help the refugees, but mobilization isn’t easy. It takes time to process the paperwork required by the government out of security. No one wants to just let in everyone without some sort of screening, but there is an immediacy for humanitarian aid no matter which party you support.

Hay Doun has brought in around 650 Syrian refugees since 2013. They are an Armenian Christian organization based in Montreal, and they have the experience to navigate the process and get people resettled here. Previously, Hay Doun was able to get refugees relocated in about 10 months, but even they are facing delays due to the paperwork slowdown.

Whatever your beliefs, if you’re interested in helping alleviate the crisis, you should work with the organizations who are making a difference. It’s time to rise above religious or political lines and reach out to those in need. Hopefully, the upcoming elections don’t affect what is being done to rescue the refugees and let them start a new life.

 

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