Social Media

Wedding Fads Sweeping Canada
There are several wedding fads sweeping Canada.

There are several wedding fads sweeping Canada.

Marriage is not a new concept. In fact, the idea of two people bringing their assets together and forming a union is a tradition that goes back thousands of years and spans countless cultures. Despite the fact that it is an old tradition, the actual act of marriage is one that has shifted a lot since it first came about. In fact, wedding traditions seem to change on a regular basis these days. If you are planning for a wedding, you might be curious about which wedding fads are the most popular in Canada right now.

By focusing on some of the more popular trends surrounding modern weddings, you will be able to get an idea of what you would like to see for your own special day. Take a moment to explore some of the popular methods. With a bit of time, you will easily be able to see which of the current wedding trends fits your needs the most.

Incorporating Social Media 

It is difficult to discuss wedding fads sweeping Canada without acknowledging the internet. Social media has revolutionized the way people all over the world are approaching their weddings. Once upon a time, you would have to wait weeks for film to develop in order to see what you looked like in your wedding outfit. Now, someone with a smartphone can show you how you look with each passing second of the day. This is just one way social media and technology have reshaped the world of matrimony.

One popular move people make these days with social media and weddings is changing their names on sites like Facebook. Traditionally, a wedding between a man and a woman results in the wife taking on the husband’s name. Some couples opt to keep their own names, but the people who decide to change their names often waste no time. Changing your last name on social media is something that many brides do right after the ceremony has ended. Find clever ways to work social media into your wedding to see results that go with the times.

Tagging Appropriately 

Among the wedding fads that are sweeping Canada and the rest of the world is hashtagging. For years now, hashtags have surfaced across hundreds of platforms to help internet users find trending topics or relevant posts. Creating a customized hashtag for your wedding is a surefire way for you to ensure that all of the pictures from your special day are in a centralized spot. As the person in charge of the wedding, it is your responsibility to make sure that people know what the hashtag for the event is going to be.

There are several ways to inform the guests of the hashtag. Have the exact phrase for the tag printed out and displayed prominently for guests to see when they pick up their seating cards. You also might want to have the DJ or emcee make the announcement once or twice throughout the night. When all of the pictures and posts from an event are under the same tag, you will be able to navigate the memories of your special day without much trouble.

Do It Your Way 

No matter how popular the trend might be, it is important to remember that this is your wedding. If you neglect to remember this fact, you could easily be assembling a wedding that does not meet your own specifications. Weigh out each of the trends that you read about and see if it is something that makes sense for your own special day. By taking the time to really discover a plan that pleases your significant other and yourself, you will be well on your way to throwing a wedding that is as modern as it is meaningful.

Responsibilities of a Wedding Guest
A great wedding guest can make or break your wedding experience.

To be a great wedding guest, make sure that you are polite and courteous.

April showers bring May flowers, but for brides, April showers bring June flowers. Summer is a popular time for weddings, so you might start getting invitations from your friends who are getting married. To survive wedding season, be the best wedding guest you can. Here are a few tips to help you:

  • RSVP by the date requested. Do not put the invitation aside for a few days, because you’ll forget. Don’t make the couple track you down for an answer.
  • Look at the invitation to see who was invited. Do not invite anyone yourself. If your children aren’t mentioned on the envelope, they are not invited to the wedding. It is customary to invite partners, but if you aren’t married or in a long-term relationship, you may have to go single.
  • Show up if you RSVP “yes.” Barring an emergency, don’t change plans at the last minute. The caterer will charge the couple for your plate, whether you show up or not.
  • Do not talk about the wedding with friends who may not have been invited. This means on social media too. You don’t want to come off as boasting or make others feel bad because they were not invited.
  • Be on time for the ceremony. Better yet, be there 10 to 15 minutes early to get the lay of the land. When you arrive late, you disrupt the flow of the ceremony. If you do arrive late, wait for a break in the action to sneak in.
  • Dress appropriately. If the invitation says “semi-formal,” don’t wear jeans. For a beach wedding, dress more casually. Don’t wear white.
  • Put your phone on silent during the ceremony. Let your babysitter know your phone will be off for a half-hour to forty-five minutes and promise to check immediately after.
  • Don’t take pictures during the ceremony. Respect the wedding photographer.
  • Ask the couple if you can share pictures on social media before you do.
  • Send the gift, if you do, to the home of the bride or groom. Don’t make them deal with more stuff at the reception.
  • During the reception, sit where the bride and groom have placed you. Make conversation with those around you. It’s only for a couple of hours. Your phone will wait.

What About the Rights of a Wedding Guest?

Wedding guests also have rights that come with their invitation:

  • You can expect to receive an invitation if you received a save-the-date card.
  • You have the right to decline the invitation if you cannot attend. No explanation needed, just say, “Thank you, I’d love to be there, but I can’t.”
  • You can ask the couple if you need clarification about your invitation. Maybe you want to make sure you understand the dress code or are confused about the plus one.
  • You have a right to not send a gift at all. You also have up to a year to send a wedding gift.
  • If you do send a gift, you have a right to expect a timely thank-you note. You might want to give the couple a few weeks after the wedding to wrap up all their duties, but if you don’t receive a thank-you note within three months, it’s perfectly acceptable to ask if they received your gift.
  • You should take advantage of the open bar, but don’t overdo it.

Have a Good Time

A wedding is a celebration, and you should have a good time. Thank the host and hostess, typically the bride’s parents, before you leave. Don’t be offended if you don’t get a few minutes with the bride and groom. One of the best things you can do as a wedding guest is to be flexible and gracious, no matter what happens at the ceremony or reception.