budget

Choosing Your Wedding Venue
When looking for the right wedding venue, couples usually settle on a church. There are many other options available to choose from.

Choosing the right wedding venue can be essential to making your big day absolutely perfect.

The wedding venue accounts for a large part of the budget and the look of your wedding. You really cannot move forward with any of the planning until you choose a venue. However, it can be very overwhelming to look at all the options. Consider these questions when choosing your wedding location:

  1. What type of wedding do you want to have?

The style of your wedding is probably one of the most important considerations. If you are having a modern, elegant wedding, you want to look for places that give you those vibes. Maybe there is a place that is particularly meaningful to you and your partner, and you really want to go there. You need to think about what you want your wedding to look like.

  1. How many guests do you expect to attend?

Even if you don’t have budget restraints, most places have a limit on how many people the venue can hold. Most places are limited by local regulations and restrictions, not because they want you to keep your guest list to a minimum. You should also remember to consider the logistics of getting everyone to this place. Is there parking? Will you need to hire a bus or limousine to transport family?

  1. What are the budget considerations?

The wedding venue can be very expensive. You have to consider how much you want to spend on the venue for the ceremony and the reception. But your budget is not the only consideration. You should also think about your guest list. Are your friends still in school? Can your extended family afford to fly to a luxury resort? Of course, you can choose to have that expensive destination wedding, but remember that if you want people to attend, you might need to look at places that are accessible and affordable.

  1. How much planning do you want to do and how much control do you need?

When it comes to some venues, you may be limited on the approved vendor list. You may have to work with a caterer who doesn’t offer the food you want. Some destination wedding locations have package deals, which make planning easy. However, you may not have many choices.

On the other hand, choosing a unique destination where you have a stunning backdrop may have its own challenges. You may have to work with each local vendor yourself and piece together the things you need to make guests comfortable. You have a lot of control this way, but it will take time to find the right vendors to provide what you want.

  1. How much money do you have for vendors?

If you are planning a lovely wedding in the mountains of Banff, you may need to pay for flowers to be shipped in. You may also find that there are fewer local vendors to provide different services. Will you have to provide travel expenses for your officiant? You have to ask yourself lots of questions about your budget before nailing a location down.

Special Requirements to Consider Chile Choosing a Wedding Venue

Don’t forget to think about the weather. Even if you’re planning an indoor ceremony and reception, you should think about what the weather could do to your plans. When you get closer to choosing a venue, ask about the rules and regulations. Some churches may not allow alcohol to be served on site. You might also want to consider locations that accommodate guests with disabilities or children.

It will take time to choose the venue that fits your needs, but it’s worth the research. Don’t forget to check on deposits and contracts and make sure your date is locked in before you move forward. Confirm everything with the venue coordinator and check in with them about every other month to make sure you’re on the calendar. Have a great wedding by getting the venue right.

Choosing the Right Wedding Date
Winter wedding dates are becoming increasingly popular.

Due to the popularity of the movie “Frozen”, more and more people are placing their wedding date in the winter.

Every bride dreams of the perfect wedding and one of the first decisions that you have to make is the date. Some couples have a special day and won’t even think about choosing another wedding date, but many people aren’t even sure where to start. Here are some tips to help you narrow the choices and select a date that will work for you.

What’s Your Dream Wedding?

When you see yourself getting married, you have to know what you envision as your ideal. Maybe you want to be married in a lush rose garden, which might mean a late spring or early summer wedding. If you’ve always wanted to get married in a vineyard, you might have to think late September or October. With the popularity of the movie “Frozen,” more couples are thinking of a beautiful white, winter wedding. Choose a season that fits your imagination.

Consider the Weather

Even if your wedding is inside, you should take into account the weather when planning the date. If you imagine the groom wearing a tux or full suit, the middle of summer might not be the best choice. It’s just too hot to be so formal in 100-degree weather. The other factor in considering the weather is your guests’ comfort. If you’re having an outside wedding, you don’t want your guests to bake in the sun or freeze because it’s too cold. Of course, there are always unseasonable temperatures, but you can’t control everything.

Consider Your Budget

There’s a reason June, September and October are popular months to get married in, and it’s because the weather is generally fairly dependable. Vendors know that these are popular months, and the prices go up during the wedding season. If you have a strict budget, you might want to consider an off-season wedding. But you do need think about sacrifices in other areas, because specialty flowers aren’t always as readily available in off-season months. Saving money with the venue, then spending it on flowers doesn’t make the most sense if you’re trying to save money.

Special Occasions to Consider for Your Wedding Date

It might be nice to get married on New Year’s Eve, because the date will always be special in more ways than one. When considering your wedding date, you have to consider the holiday season. On Valentine’s Day, roses tend to be more expensive, which could increase your budget. If you live in a college town, you may also have to think about sports events, such as homecoming. This might make it difficult for your friends and family to find reasonable accommodations. Hotels, flights and car rentals all tend to get more expensive on holiday weekends and when demand is higher.

Another element in looking at special dates is that of those dates special to you and your spouse. Whether it’s the day you met or your grandparent’s anniversary, you may be looking at one particular date. Consider how important the actual date is versus some flexibility in scheduling.

The Venues May Have Limited Availability

Once you choose your ideal date, you have to work it out with your venues. Often, churches won’t hold weddings on Sundays because they are using the facility for their own services. With some places, you may have to work around corporate events or other weddings. Again, some flexibility is always good when planning, especially when you have a short time frame.

Decide what’s most important to you when choosing your wedding date and what you won’t compromise on. Check with family members and your wedding party to make sure you’re not planning your wedding on top of someone’s graduation from college or silver anniversary wedding trip. It will save you a lot of headache in the long run. Although you cannot plan for every contingency, you can really consider some of the most important factors in choosing your wedding date to have the wedding of your dreams.

Budgeting for the Wedding – Who Pays for What?
A person budgeting for a wedding

Proper budgeting is essential.

The cost of a wedding can approach the expense of new car or even more, depending on any number of items. According to The Huffington Post, a wedding in Quebec can run about $8,400 for just 77 guests, but one survey found that the average amount spent on a wedding was about $23,000. That figure does not include the engagement ring or honeymoon. Today’s couples have to make sure they have budgeted for their wedding. Traditionally, families were expected to help with the expenses, but in today’s environment, that isn’t always the case. Although the lines of who pays what for a wedding are definitely blurred, there are some customary divisions.

The Groom and His Family

The groom and his family have the easier burden when it comes to the wedding. The groom generally pays for the engagement ring and bride’s wedding ring. He should also expect to be responsible for:

  • His attire
  • Boutonnieres and corsages for his side of the wedding party
  • Officiant’s fee, plus accommodations and transportation
  • Marriage license
  • Bride’s gift
  • Gifts for the groomsmen
  • DJ or music at the reception
  • Liquor at the reception

Because the groom’s family traditionally hosts the rehearsal dinner, he or his family should expect to manage all the expenses associated with it.

The Bride and Her Family

Generally, if it isn’t in the groom’s list, it’s the bride’s responsibility. This includes the ceremony and reception expenses, as well as all of the planning, invitations, and photography. Most of the big ticket items are under the bride’s purview. The bride’s family is generally the one who hosts the engagement party, and the bride’s parents are considered the hosts of the reception. This is one reason their name is listed first on the invitation. If the bride hosts a luncheon for the bridesmaids, it is her responsibility to pay for the party.

The Attendants

Although the bride and groom are responsible for most of the expenses associated with the wedding, the attendants should pay for their own attire and accessories. Considerate brides and grooms may offer to assist with costs if the attendant is not able. The bride and groom may also need to provide attire for younger attendants such as the ring bearer or flower girl who do not have discretionary income.

The attendants generally work together to host the bachelor or bachelorette party, and the maid of honor and bridesmaids may host the bridal shower. Attendants should also arrange their own transportation to and from the wedding. Sometimes, the attendants chip in together for a gift for the couple, but it isn’t mandatory.

Contemporary Views of Who Pays

More couples are waiting until they are older and settled into a career and home before they tie the knot. This lets them contribute more money to their own affairs and not ask their parents to cover any expenses. Some families are splitting the bill in thirds, where the groom’s family, the bride’s family, and the couple each pay for one-third of the wedding.

Instead of looking at traditional lists of who pays for what, it’s important to consider the abilities of each party. Adult brides and grooms who have been managing their own finances should not expect parents to cover any of the costs. If the parent offers, then consider it a blessing and don’t ask for more. Second-time brides and grooms are pretty much on their own when it comes to wedding expenses.

Instead of making your wedding about money, take the time before you ever make plans to work out a budget and know exactly what you and your future spouse can afford. Stay within your budget to get started on the right foot without going into debt and dealing with a truckload of bills in your first year of marriage.